The election no one wanted

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Thank you to everyone who participated in the electoral process – poll workers, volunteers, candidates, and most importantly, everyone who took the time to vote. It is an honor to be the Member of Parliament for Elmwood-Transcona again.

It’s no secret that no one wanted this year’s federal election except Justin Trudeau.

There were many reasons not to have an election when we did. I am proud to have led the charge in Parliament to adapt our electoral rules to the pandemic. I shared the frustration of people that Justin Trudeau decided to go ahead before this job was finished.

We must now ask ourselves why a Prime Minister was both willing and able to call such a misguided election when it was clear that an overwhelming majority of Canadians opposed it.

By law, the next election should have taken place in October 2023, unless the prime minister loses the confidence of the House. Usually that means losing an important vote in the House of Commons, like a vote on the budget, but historically the Prime Minister can decide that he has lost the confidence of the House without a vote.

This is because the monarchy has an ancient right to convene, prorogue, and dissolve parliaments as it sees fit. Over time, the Governor General could only do so on the advice of the Prime Minister. So while this is technically a Crown right, constitutionally protected, it is essentially a power of the Prime Minister.

According to experts, this means that a constitutional amendment would be needed to limit this power and enforce fixed election date, so that there is no penalty for violating the law on a fixed election date. . This is how the Prime Minister was able to call the election.

But why did he want to call an election when no one else did?

In the Canadian electoral system, political parties can form a majority government with less than 40 percent of the vote and gain 100 percent of the power.

In our voting system, a little bump in the polls can mean a lot of extra seats. The leaders are encouraged by this system to organize early elections in order to be able to steal the majority. Then they can do whatever they want without having to negotiate with others.

Canadians thwarted Justin Trudeau’s cynical takeover in the last election; a result of which I am both grateful and proud. The next step is to change our voting system so that future prime ministers are not encouraged to choose unnecessary elections over the hard work of forging a majority consensus in Parliament.

Thank you to everyone who participated in the electoral process – poll workers, volunteers, candidates, and most importantly, everyone who took the time to vote. It is an honor to be the Member of Parliament for Elmwood-Transcona again.

It’s no secret that no one wanted this year’s federal election except Justin Trudeau.

There were many reasons not to have an election when we did. I am proud to have led the charge in Parliament to adapt our electoral rules to the pandemic. I shared the frustration of people that Justin Trudeau decided to go ahead before this job was finished.

We must now ask ourselves why a Prime Minister was both willing and able to call such a misguided election when it was clear that an overwhelming majority of Canadians opposed it.

By law, the next election should have taken place in October 2023, unless the prime minister loses the confidence of the House. Usually that means losing an important vote in the House of Commons, like a vote on the budget, but historically the Prime Minister can decide that he has lost the confidence of the House without a vote.

This is because the monarchy has an ancient right to convene, prorogue, and dissolve parliaments as it sees fit. Over time, the Governor General could only do so on the advice of the Prime Minister. So while this is technically a Crown right, constitutionally protected, it is essentially a power of the Prime Minister.

According to experts, this means that a constitutional amendment would be needed to limit this power and enforce fixed election date, so that there is no penalty for violating the law on a fixed election date. . This is how the Prime Minister was able to call the election.

But why did he want to call an election when no one else did?

In the Canadian electoral system, political parties can form a majority government with less than 40 percent of the vote and gain 100 percent of the power.

In our voting system, a little bump in the polls can mean a lot of extra seats. The leaders are encouraged by this system to organize early elections in order to be able to steal the majority. Then they can do whatever they want without having to negotiate with others.

Canadians thwarted Justin Trudeau’s cynical takeover in the last election; a result of which I am both grateful and proud. The next step is to change our voting system so that future prime ministers are not encouraged to choose unnecessary elections over the hard work of forging a majority consensus in Parliament.

Daniel Blaikie

Daniel Blaikie
Elmwood-Transcona Riding Report

Daniel Blaikie is the NDP MP for Elmwood-Transcona.

Read the full biography


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